Memorial of Saint Charles Lwanga and Companions, Martyrs

Lectionary: 302


The LORD is in his holy temple;
the LORD's throne is in heaven.
His eyes behold,
his searching glance is on mankind.



Perhaps more than any other saint in the Catholic pantheon, Saint Francis of Assisi was able to balance the mysterious paradoxes of our faith. He could imagine the beautiful child born in Bethlehem, the compassionate healer who preached the Kingdom of God, the tragedy of his crucifixion and the glory of his resurrection. Francis could worship the Majesty of God in his holy temple and the puling infant in the manger. He was caught up in ecstasy by the gales of the Holy Spirit and guided into prayer by zephyrs of divine impulse.

Our responsorial psalm today celebrates the Lord in his holy temple, his throne in heaven and his searching glance on mankind.

I suppose most of us have gotten used to the new translation of the Mass prayers. The popes John Paul II and Benedict XVI objected to having sixteen different English translations of the universal church's most important rite; and many Americans objected to the flat, casual, too informal translations of the 1975 translation. They wanted more formality to accentuate the grandeur of God. The First Eucharistic Prayer certainly approaches that goal; it probably feels over the top to some but I think we should resist a coarsening culture. When so many people amuse themselves with murder, violence, drugs, tattoos and excess hair we might pause to consider: 
The LORD is in his holy temple;
the LORD's throne is in heaven.
His eyes behold,
his searching glance is on mankind.

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I love to write. This blog helps me to meditate on the Word of God, and I hope to make some contribution to our contemplations of God's Mighty Works.

Ordinarily, I write these reflections two or three weeks in advance of their publication. I do not intend to comment on current events.

I understand many people prefer gender-neutral references to "God." I don't disagree with them but find that language impersonal, unappealing and tasteless. When I refer to "God" I think of the One whom Jesus called "Abba" and "Father", and I would not attempt to improve on Jesus' language.

You're welcome to add a thought or raise a question.